Interesting Links for 20-09-2017

Sep. 20th, 2017 12:00 pm

Gray day... everything is gray

Sep. 23rd, 2017 11:46 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
I watch, but nothing moves today.

Looks like it's going to be overcast all week, and next week too. Well, fuck. I'm putting my lightbox back on.

*********


Superheroes for the Jewish New Year

There Never Was a Real Tulip Fever

The 11 sisters of Siervas are a rock band like 'nun' other

Scientists Once Dressed Frogs in Tiny Pants to Study Reproduction

In Alaska’s Far-Flung Villages, Happiness Is a Cake Mix

Octlantis is a just-discovered underwater city engineered by octopuses

How Two Lesbians Fought the Nazis With a Typewriter

Meet Nazo Dharejo: The toughest woman in Sindh

In a First for the Nation, Portland Police End Gang List to Improve Relations With Blacks and Latinos

The Rust Belt Needs Legal Immigration

That Awkward Moment When Your Twin Brother Is A U.S. Citizen At Birth, But You’re Not

Lawsuit targets searches of electronic devices at US border

New hope for limiting warming to 1.5 C

This Department Is the Last Hideout of Climate Change Believers in Donald Trump’s Government

Child care choices limited for those working outside 9-to-5

St. Louis sees third day of protests after officer's acquittal

ICE Detained This Trafficking Victim on Her 18th Birthday. Why?

Hurricane Maria is following Irma's path and getting stronger

The Sci-Fi Roots of the Far Right—From ‘Lucifer’s Hammer’ to Newt’s Moon Base to Donald’s Wall

Graceful menace: States take aim at non-native swans

New Mideast realities require support for Kurds

What is at stake in Iraqi Kurdish vote for independence?

Iraq says may use force if Kurdish referendum turns violent

Signed Eva up for a drama class

Sep. 21st, 2017 10:58 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
It took a lot of back and forth and emails getting lost, but I got her signed up!

And now she's claiming she didn't ever ask for this in the first place. Yeah, right. I get that she wants to spend time with her friends, but - dude, she spends hours with them every single day. She can take a day off and maybe make some new friends, something she frequently claims she wants.

***************


10 Badass Trees That Refuse To Die

The Making of the Modern American Recipe

Marilyn Monroe and the Potato Sack Dress, c.1951

DNA triggers shape-shifting in hydrogels, opening a new way to make 'soft robots'

The Spanish Royal Philanthropic Expedition to Bring Smallpox Vaccination to the New World and Asia in the 19th Century

Stopped at US border, Haitians find 'Mexican dream' instead

How Pants Went From Banned to Required in the Roman Empire

Just squeeze in—researchers discover when spaces are tight, nature loosens its laws

In Amish Country, the Future Is Calling

Children Used to Learn About Death and Damnation With Their ABCs

The Problem With Free Menstrual Pads

Tillerson says U.S. could stay in Paris climate accord

The Commuter Parking Benefit Is Seriously Hurting Cities

Dylann Roof requests new attorneys, declaring appeal team his biological enemies (Relevant quote: “The lawyer appointed to represent me at my federal trial was David Isaac Bruck, who is also Jewish. His ethnicity was a constant source of conflict even with my constant efforts to look past it.” All his lawyers deserve medals and a fruit basket. Maybe some booze. They earned it after putting up with him!)

US people of color still more likely to be exposed to pollution than white people

Breastfeeding Behind Bars: Do All Moms Deserve the Right?

When Does the Right to an Attorney Kick In?

Why Many Deaf Prisoners Can’t Call Home

Unbudgeted: How the opioid crisis is blowing a hole in small-town America's finances

See jerkface bacteria hiding in tumors and gobbling chemotherapy drugs

Myanmar Follows Global Pattern in How Ethnic Cleansing Begins

Rohingya Muslims being wiped off Myanmar's map

Three killed in stampede for aid near Rohingya refugee camp

Bangladesh warns Myanmar over border amid refugee crisis

The Ominous, Massive Military Exercises in Eastern Europe

September 19--Hello Kitty Knows Best

Sep. 19th, 2017 08:27 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I presented my first lecture of the semester on fluid and electrolytes. Much of it is preparatory for the content that is to come. It's a long lecture--about 5 hours over 2 days. I'll finish it tomorrow. I don't really need 5 hours. I can cover it in 4, but I use the last hour to play Fluid and Electrolyte Jeopardy.

It was interesting that, even with all the little stories I drop in, the lecture times out to each break almost to the minute. When it is break time, I make a note on the slide "Hour 1, fall 2017" or something like that. I have been on the same slides for my breaks three semesters in a row.

One of my favorite things about lecturing is dropping in those little stories. Sometimes they are related to the content, but sometimes they are just stories about nursing in general. I am very comfortable in the classroom, even though I am a shy introvert. I think I have made that observation previously. Probably every semester, at about the same date. lol.

I had to spend some non-classroom time typing up some more stuff from our accreditation meeting yesterday. I did it early, before class began. I didn't want to go in early, but glad I did so I could get it done and sent out.

Malida and I had dinner at the sushi place again. In spite of having just read some article about never ordering bacon-wrapped anything, I ended up ordering some bacon-wrapped scallops. I saw the author's point. My other disappointment was seeing a frozen gyazo delivery truck parked out back. Anyway, Malida loves the sushi there, so we will be back again.

bacon wrapped anything

The weather is so perfect these days. I sat out in the back yard a bit this afternoon and looked at my garden. there was a hibiscus blossom, and I took a picture. It was pretty low on the plant, so I dubbed it a lowbiscus.

lowbiscus

I engaged in a debate with my first wife's cousin's husband, a Trump Supporter, about the potential repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. We went back and forth, but remained civil. I posed a question four different times: What happens to a person without health insurance, who doesn't meet the criteria for either Medicare or Medicaid, who becomes seriously ill? Do we deny them care? Four times he avoided the question. For me, this question is the heart of the debate.

(no subject)

Sep. 19th, 2017 06:56 am
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Saturday i worked in the yard, mainly eradicating stiltgrass and stands of Boehmeria cylindrica (False nettle, by which they mean "non-stinging nettle") by mechanical means.

Boehmeria cylindrica clearly reproduces successfully, so i want to get rid of it in a number of places where it is "weedy." On the other hand, it is native, so i should find some place(s) for it to thrive. I see one resource claims it prefers sandy or loamy soil: i wonder if there's actually loam in the places it is growing. I generally assume everything is clay.

So, in the first area of work there was the manual pulling out. The stilt grass is about a meter high, and heaven only knows what has made a home in the thick stands. I've not seen any snakes yet, but spiders and toads and bright green leafhoppers seem disrupted. I found one milkweed growing in the stand, Asclepias variegata (White milkweed) or A syriaca (common milkweed): that was delightful! And i found a good number my current favorite little plants: moonworts (or grapeferns). These have a single frond, and then a spore bearing structure lifted like a flag above the solar panel that is the leaf. This 2014 literature review describes them as rare but (at least) one species is definitely common here. I believe i've had success transplanting them, despite comments about them being challenging. I take that to mean that the interdependence with fungi is supported over the small distances in which i have moved them. Transplanting to potting soil would likely be bad.

I also rediscovered one of the colonies of Goodyera pubescens (rattlesnake orchid). It too is usually accompanied by the warning against transplanting because of the mycorrhizal interactions: i may try moving some to some places i feel i can more easily protect from trampling over time.

Later in the day i used the sling blade and the weed whacker and the lawn mower. The mower can deal with the tall stands, but i don't want to hit hidden stumps, any more than i already do. The weed whacker gets the grass all tangled in the drive: it's not a particularly good tool on the tall stands.

I grew a little disappointed in the lawn mower repair. I don't think the mechanism for raising and lowering works the way it is supposed to: it's as if the front is now at a fixed height. The lawn mower repair process was so distressing for Christine, i don't want to bring it up. But, fie, it was useful to have the great range in height.

--== ∞ ==--

Sunday began with me breaking the stylus on my phone. The version of the Galaxy Note i have was reported to have a stylus issue in that if you inserted it in the storage bit backwards, it would jam and there was little that could be done. Now i understand: while one can pull out the stylus, the little springy top, like the "clicker" on a retractable ball point, breaks off and jams in, disrupting whatever signal the phone has to turn on the pen functioning. I am glad that the new note has been released but i believe it is a bit larger than this phone - so my nice case wouldn't be used. And we bought this phone outright. After spending some time thinking about it, i decided that i am ok giving up the stylus and just using the phone as any other phone for a while longer. All the critical phone functionality still works, and i can always take a pad of paper outside with me.

If i were doing real field work, i would have a reason to spend the money on a new phone, i don't really now.

And there's also the question of the iPad, which has superior drawing applications, and whether i really need a second digital pad (that's smaller and lighter and "always" with me, sigh).

I worked myself up into other dithers on Sunday morning as well. Things i hadn't done for Meeting, baking for meeting for business potluck with a recipe that i hadn't used before, realizing i hadn't really left time for the longer than expected baking time, discovering i didn't quite have the right quantities of ingredients, running late....

I indulged myself the rest of the day after Meeting, going to a historical society presentation (the president is a member of Meeting as well) and reading a novel (a Maisy Dobbs mystery). I finished the book after dark and needed to take Carrie for her walk, so i went into Pittsboro and walked her on the streetlamp lit sidewalks. I think Carrie was delighted with the novelty, and i enjoyed it too. It will be agreeable to walk there this winter.

Monday was a long work day, mainly meetings. We had the first visit of the young woman we have hired to clean our bathrooms. She's incredibly professional, and someday she'll finish her vet school training and will take her professionalism on to her own vet practice. Until then, i think we'll be delighted with her help.

Interesting Links for 19-09-2017

Sep. 19th, 2017 12:00 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
Even though the students weren't there today, I had a busy day doing the stuff I do when students aren't there. I got in early to type up the notes from our last 4th semester team meeting so I could send them to my colleagues in advance of our next meeting this morning. Then I worked on accreditation stuff for a while, in anticipation of our accreditation team meeting this afternoon.

In between I worked on my next lecture. It deals with septic shock. The conference I attended last week had all the newest guidelines for sepsis, and a lot has changed in how we screen for sepsis, what we call what we find, and how we treat it. I will need to still teach the old stuff, as the questions on the licensing exams are somewhat behind the latest trends. I will teach the new stuff too, though, because that's what the students will face when they get out in practice.

I called one of my old friends in the ICU who is in my old educator role. We chatted for a bit, and talked about how they are approaching the new guidelines. They are somewhat in the middle, between the old stuff and the new stuff, as is the hospital where I take my students. It took a long time to get people to take sepsis seriously and embrace the old guidelines. It is somewhat gratifying that they embraced them so vigorously that they are reluctant to let go, but they will, as they always do.

We had our team meeting, which went well. I am the faculty lead for our team this semester, and it feels kind of strange to be leading the meetings. I also get stuck taking the notes. In any case, we have a standard format for team notes now, and it works out well.

I usually try and get out of there and get lunch on the way home, but since I had an afternoon meeting, I walked over to the sandwich place next to the coffee place I like. I haven't eaten there in years, since I was in the photography program. After they opened, they invited student artists and photographers to hang their work, and sell it. I was able to hang a bunch of prints, and made more money than I ever expected.

Now that it is so close, I decided to get a sandwich. It was big--so big that I saved half for tomorrow. It was delicious as well, and only one of a substantial sandwich menu. I'll be back for sure.

sandwich

After I ate I got ready for my accreditation team meeting. It was productive, and we are all on the same page. We have a lot of work ahead of us, but we need to do that work anyway for our nursing board visit next year.

I came home and watched the first episode of the new Ken Burns documentary on Vietnam. The first episode related the history that led up to the war. Some of it I knew, but much was new to me. I think it is going to be a fascinating and illuminating story, as pretty much everything Ken Burns tackles is.

During our accreditation meeting, we got off track a bit and someone started talking about a student at another nursing program who wanted to take their service dog with them to their clinical rotation in the hospital, and about all the places dogs can't (or shouldn't go) in a hospital. In my mind I thought, "I have my subject line!"

September 17--Into the Woods.

Sep. 18th, 2017 07:31 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I managed to get Malida out into the world, and we drove out to the Cosumnes River Preserve, which is a nature preserve along the Cosumnes River. I seem to recall writing about this place before, and the whole thing about there only being one N in Cosumnes. In any case, we went out there for a walk.

It was a spectacular day for a walk. The temperature was in the mod 70s, and there was a gentle breeze from the west, which is where the best breezes come from. There were quite a few cars parked, but we really didn't see that many people on the trail. It's kind of spread out. We took the loop that goes out to the river, and then back through the fields.

I've been coming here since it first opened back in the 80s. I remember when they planted oak trees that are now getting large. It's always been one of my favorite places to come and think and walk.

into the woods

After our hike, which earned us about 11,000 steps each, we headed to the Korea BBQ place and had a nice lunch, then headed home to enjoy the balance of our weekend.

Delta

Sep. 18th, 2017 12:54 pm
rebeccmeister: (Default)
[personal profile] rebeccmeister
What with the impending change in life circumstances (the cliff at the end of the year), [personal profile] scrottie has been keen to check out some marinas in the Sacramento River Delta. The Delta as a whole is fascinating. It covers a huge area. Recognizing that a lot of the lower stretches have incredibly rich soil, people have put in an extraordinary amount of effort to claim land back from the river waters. The outcome is a reticulated network of waterways surrounding tiled islands kept (mostly) dry by levees. It's like an American equivalent of the Netherlands. The only thing is, a lot of the reclaimed land consists of peat bogs, which start to sink if they aren't periodically recharged with new nutrient and plant inputs. So occasionally, there's a watery hole in the island network.

Anyway, not too long ago, S got his boat back from Bethel Harbor, and they suggested he go and check out a place called Owl Harbor as a potential alternative to his current mooring at someone's house in Discovery Bay. Initial investigations suggested Owl Harbor was accessible by a multi-transit expedition, so we decided to go for it on Sunday. We rode over to the Richmond station and threw ourselves and our bicycles onto an Amtrak train bound for Antioch. Then we picked up our bikes and rode along the heavily industrial waterfront over to the Antioch Bridge.

Things didn't look so promising at the bridge. The southbound onramp had a sign posted saying that bicycles and pedestrians were prohibited. The OoGley-derived directions had us heading up the southbound off-ramp, which lacked any sort of promising infrastructure and sounded like the worst of all terrible ideas. It was starting to look like the trip would be a complete flop. But at least the weather was nice and we were out on our bicycles. I proposed crossing under the bridge to examine the northbound onramp, where we finally spied a promising sign that read, "PEDESTRIANS BICYCLES MOTOR-DRIVEN CYCLES PERMITTED." There was a toll booth slightly ahead, so we cautiously rode up to it and confirmed with a tool booth worker that yes, indeed, we could ride our bicycles across the bridge. No toll necessary, for bicycles.

So I paused to snap a photo, as evidence:
Yes, you can cross the Antioch Bridge by bicycle

And we proceeded across.

The bridge reminded me of a number of the bridges I drove across in Louisiana. You feel like you're going to climb forever into the sky, but then eventually you reach the crest and cruise back down on the far side. The whole thing feels impossibly narrow and ridiculously high, but I guess that's what it takes to make sure that enormous shipping vessels can fit through.

I don't think I'd ride over that bridge just for fun, but I've ridden in worse places.

I didn't take any photos at Owl Harbor, but it was indeed a very nice marina, and there were many lovely boats of different ages and character moored there. The person working in the office that day suggested we fit in a 10-mile expedition around the "Delta Loop" to learn more about the local geography, so we did.

We had lunch at another nice little marina, just down the road:
Lunch stop at a marina along the Delta Loop

And as we continued to ride along, we saw all manner of other watercraft, in all sorts of shape, ranging from well-appointed river barges to half-sunk catastrophes. I could spend all week ogling boats.

We didn't pause for more photos, however, aside from this one:

Cycling around the Delta Loop

Then it was time to head back to Antioch to catch our return train.

We couldn't stop marveling about the whole bridge experience. Here's the Antioch bridge, viewed from near the Antioch train station:
View of the Antioch Bridge

Now I'm really curious about how it came to be, that the bridge is all-access. Was that included in the original plans, or a product of bike/ped interest groups working hard to advocate for access? Why is the Antioch bridge open, while the bridge between Richmond and the Marin Headlands remains only a dream?

Anyway, it was cool to have that sort of adventure in that pocket of California. The Sacramento River Delta is a fascinating place.

dealing with other generations

Sep. 18th, 2017 12:33 pm
sistawendy: (drama)
[personal profile] sistawendy
Bad: Dr. Kidshrink is moving to Hawaii next month.

Good: He'll do at least a few sessions with m'boy via Skype.

Bad: Mom apparently has had fraudulent activity on her credit cards, enough to max them out. That's likely due to Mom's giving out her personal information exactly as Good Sister told her repeatedly not to.

Worse: Mom tried to cancel the cards instead of just reporting the fraudulent activity, so of course the credit card issuer shunted her to someone who tried to talk her out of it. In other words, not only is Mom's addled pate getting her into more financial messes; it no longer helps her get out of them.

I missed the usual Sunday morning call time because I was brunching with the Tickler, for which I now feel a tiny bit guilty. I haven't talked to her since what, Friday? Mom, like much of Florida, still has no internet because of the hurricane, so she hasn't been emailing me every morning as usual. GS & I shared a dark laugh that Mom's coming unplugged isn't necessarily a bad thing.

I'm less cranky now about GS dragging me to Florida in January. Watching out for Mom from DC is no mean feat, and she's been doing it for a few years now. She's earned some slack from me, I think.

Where's Evil Sister in all this? Her name hasn't come up. I guess she's in San Antonio, TX, and that's all I know.

The b(r)e(a)st of science marches on.

Sep. 18th, 2017 07:37 am
sistawendy: (weirded out)
[personal profile] sistawendy
A little over seven years ago, I posted a poll in an attempt to learn something about relative breast size vs. hand preference. My conclusion was that which of your boobs is larger doesn't correlate to hand preference, but asymmetry in general just might.

But the original study isn't quite what this entry is about. A few of you breast owners told me then that breasts are changeable creatures, and which one of yours is larger can be influenced by lots of factors. In other words, boobs happen. I've finally experienced this in the last few months: my left one used to be bigger, and now my right one seems to be.

I haven't changed my hormone dose since around the time I posted the poll. I've been eating & exercising the same for years. Could this be a breast explosion like the ones some of my cisgender friends report undergoing in their teens? I don't think so, but if I find myself in need of 38D (!) bras a few months hence, that'll will be a) scientifically interesting, b) rare as hens' teeth because yo, trans, and c) not unwelcome because a 38" chest makes even reasonaboobs look small.
basefinder: (Default)
[personal profile] basefinder
I spotted this one from the car as Debbie was driving us somewhere. It's a building I've known about for over a year, but didn't know the location. I recognized it immediately from seeing it in a photograph.

The neighborhood has gotten a bit sketchy (notice they have a barbed wire fence around their parking area), but I had to get photos of this important building.

Milo S. Ketchum, Jr. was an engineer and thin concrete shell innovator. In 1953, he needed a larger office for his engineering firm Ketchum, Konkel & Hasting. This building was Ketchum's design (I suspect he may have worked with architect Thomas E. Moore but have not confirmed this). The tall north windows allowed plenty of natural light, without shadows or glare, for drafting. I was very pleased to see that another architectural-construction firm now uses this building.















S

Interesting Links for 17-09-2017

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:00 pm

September 16--My little buddy Al

Sep. 16th, 2017 09:35 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I sat out on the back patio this morning, sipping my coffee and just enjoying the day. Nothing hanging over me. As I was sitting there, I heard the loud hummingbird approaching the feeder. He dwelled there for a moment, then flew toward me. He kind of flew back and forth sideways in front of me, getting closer and closer. When he was about 2 feet from me, he kind of hovered and watched me for close to a minute. Then he flew to the left of me and watched for a bit longer.

The feeder was almost empty, so I took it as a sign that he wanted new food, which I provided. I was thinking about him as I cleaned the feeder. He is the only one who makes noise like that. Most of them are pretty quiet. He is also the one that chases some of the other hummingbirds away from the feeder. I decided that he is the alpha hummingbird for this little piece of the world, and that the sound is deliberate. From now on I will call him Al.

No, I didn't have my camera with me. :(

I went out for a walk in the late morning. Malida is heavy into watching Game of Thrones, so didn't want to leave. This evening she proudly declared that she had walked almost 300 steps today! Lol. She works these 14 hour days, and I don't blame her for staying put on her day off. Tomorrow we are planning a little hike at the wildlife preserve.

I walked in the park. It was kind of overcast, and muggy, but only in the low 80s, which is tolerable. The park was full of people doing things. I did my usual circuit.

the park

This picture looks skewed to the right a bit, but I don't think it is. when I look through the viewfinder, I tend to skew to the left a bit. I don't know. I'm confused now.

Anyway, as I was getting toward the end of the walk, I added a resonator to an Ingress portal, and saw on the screen that this particular action elevated me to the next level. I don't play very aggressively any more, so it has taken a while to get to this level. I was pleased. Later, I looked at the stats generator and it is predicting that, at my current rate of play, I will get the highest level of a particular medal in the year 2080. I'll be 124 years old. Something to live for.

level 13

(no subject)

Sep. 20th, 2017 11:18 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Tough stuff: Spider silk enhanced with graphene-based materials

The Most Inspiring Hot Air Balloon Ride Ever

Scientists use light to purge defects from solar cells

Every childhood vaccine may eventually go into a single jab (Though it does seem that the UK doesn't have as many childhood vaccines as the US, judging by the list)

Mathematicians Measure Infinities, and Find They're Equal (Mind. Blown.)

Can American soil be brought back to life?

Quotas bring wave of Nepalese women into office. What they need next.

Judge: Sessions can’t deny grant money for sanctuary cities

Disability Fraud: You know what?

For Chinese millennials, despondency has a brand name

A Son’s Race to Give His Dying Father Artificial Immortality

Research Shows Spanish Speakers Take Longer To Learn English. Why?

Catalan mayors defy Spanish courts ahead of independence vote

Survey suggests nobody actually watches those Emmy-nominated cable or streaming shows

Suicide among veterans highest in western US, rural areas

Viruses Would Rather Jump to New Hosts Than Evolve With Them

Your Childhood Experiences Can Permanently Change Your DNA

Third-Hand Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Can Still Damage Your Organs

Protesters march through St. Louis after policeman's acquittal

Attorneys Suspect Motel 6 Calling ICE on Undocumented Guests

Since Trump’s Big Photo Op With Black College Leaders, He’s Delivered on Nothing, They Say (Surprise, surprise.)

Homeless And In College. Then Harvey Struck

Hurricanes may be getting bigger, but death toll is shrinking

Irma's 'forgotten' evacuees struggle to find housing

Hurricane Irma Unleashes the Forces of Privatization in Puerto Rico

Philippines' Duterte asks head of human rights agency: 'Are you a pedophile?' (Because, you know, that's the only reason to care about minors being straight-up murdered)

Entire Philippine city police force fired over killings

The Window Is Closing to Avoid Dangerous Global Warming

U.S.-backed Syrian fighters say will not let government forces cross Euphrates

Rohingya crisis: Bangladesh to restrict movement of migrants

Overnight exodus: Rohingya use cover of darkness to reach Bangladesh
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